The 3rd International Workshops on Advances in Computational Mechanics
October 12-14, 2015
Tokyo, Japan

Organized by:

Organized Workshops

The two-days workshops will consist of invited lectures and contributed presentations. All speakers are invited. If you are interested in contributing to one(s) of the workshops listed below, please contact the corresponding workshop organizer(s) via e-mail.

OW1: Recent development in structural and multidisciplinary optimization
OW2: Structural collapse / structural impact analyses
OW3: Multiscale simulation and materials modeling
OW4: High performance computing for computational engineering and science
OW5: Mesoscale simulations for materials and fluids
OW6: Simulation for natural disaster mitigation and environmental problems
OW7: Computational biomechanics at nano and micro scales
OW8: Particle simulations for fluid and solid mechanics
OW9: Fracture and Damage Mechanics of Advanced Materials

OW1: Recent development in structural and multidisciplinary optimization

Growing concerns in the recent years about effective design approaches for new or advanced materials/structures have triggered much interest in utilization of numerical technologies and development of structural and multidisciplinary optimization in various engineering fields. These interests have led to emerging strategies, e.g. material topology optimization, multiple material optimization, hierarchical or multi-scale optimization etc. These strategies may be extended to design problems of the complex material/structural behavior based on a physical point of view. This workshop discusses the recent development in structural and multidisciplinary optimization including all pending challenges in this area, for example,

  • Optimal design of microstructure based on homogenization method
  • Hierarchical optimization of material and structures
  • Composite materials and structures
  • Optimization with multi-scale analysis
  • Enabling innovations in design optimization
  • Material and/or kinematical nonlinearity for material design and optimization
  • Phase-field and level-set method for material design
  • Optimal design of functional materials
  • Optimization based on thermo-mechanics, fluid dynamics, electromagnetics
  • Optimization problems of multi-physics
  • Material parameter identifications and inverse problems

Organizers:

  • J. Kato (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • S. Yamasaki (Osaka University, Japan)
  • K. Suzuki (University of Tokyo, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: jkatocivil.tohoku.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Mathias Wallin (Lund University, Sweden)
  • Mathias Stolpe (Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Denmark)
  • Yoshihiro Kanno (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Satoshi Kitayama (Kanazawa University, Japan)
  • İlker Temizer (Bilkent University, Turkey)
  • Junji Kato (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Makoto Yamakawa (Tokyo Denki University, Japan)
  • Kazuhiro Izui (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Seungjae Min (Hanyang University, Republic of Korea)
  • Oded Amir (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel)
  • Shintaro Yamasaki (Osaka University, Japan)
  • Daisuke Murai (Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories Institute, Japan)
  • Akihiro Takezawa (Hiroshima University, Japan)
  • Tsuyoshi Nomura (Toyota Central R&D Labs., Inc., Japan)
  • Camille Perrot (Université Paris-Est, France)
  • Takashi Yamamoto (Kogakuin University, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW1-1 OW1-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW1-3 OW1-4 OW1-5

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OW2: Structural collapse / structural impact analyses

Catastrophic disasters of structures occurred recently are mainly caused by sudden, extreme external loads such as aircraft collision, explosion, large seismic excitation, tsunami, typhoon, tornado, and big fire. Dynamic numerical codes are generally used to investigate such phenomena. However, strong nonlinearity in the deformation of structures and rapidness of the external loads often generate higher hurdle in the analyses. The main purpose of this workshop is to bring together scientists and engineers who work in the fields mentioned above, and to discuss on the state-of-the-art numerical codes and the numerical analyses regarding collapse and impact problems of civil and architectural structures.

Organizers:

  • D. Isobe (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
  • S. Moriguchi (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • M. Beppu (National Defense Academy, Japan)
  • S. Okazawa (University of Yamanashi, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: isobekz.tsukuba.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Daigoro Isobe (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
  • Yuki Onishi (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Jinkoo Kim (Sungkyunkwan University, Republic of Korea)
  • Theodor Krauthammer (University of Florida, CIPPS, U.S.A.)
  • Takashi Matsushima (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
  • Michele Chiumenti (Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Spain)
  • Yu Huang (Tongji University, China)
  • Takumi Ito (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • Dorival Pedroso (The University of Queensland, Australia)
  • Masuhiro Beppu (National Defense Academy, Japan)
  • Shuji Moriguchi (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Shojiro Motoyui (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Yoshimi Sonoda (Kyushu University, Japan)
  • Yoshihito Yamamoto (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • Yong Lu (University of Edinburgh, U.K.)
  • Shigenobu Okazawa (University of Yamanashi, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW2-1 OW2-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW2-3 OW2-4 OW2-5

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OW3: Multiscale simulation and materials modeling

Multiscale simulations and materials modeling are now becoming extremely powerful tools for exploring the physical picture of nonlinear mechanical behavior of materials in the entire range from micro- to macro-scale. Multiscale simulation can derive the macro-scopic material behavior incorporating the influence of underlying micro-scopic material structure. On the other hand, multiscale materials modeling can reveal the physics and mechanics of material defects in each length- and time-scales. The information is then used in the simulation of the material behavior in the larger length- and longer time-scale. Although these multiscale approaches have been developed for several decades and made a lot of successes in the application to practical and scientific problems, it is necessary to enhance exiting multiscale concepts, and to develop new multiscale methods for making further contributions to the structural analysis and material design.

The aim of the workshop is to bring together scientists and engineers working in the multiscale simulations and materials modeling, and to discuss the recent advances in the methodologies and applications of the multiscale simulations and materials modeling.

Organizers:

  • A. Takahashi (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • Y. Tadano (Saga University, Japan)
  • K. Matsui (Yokohama National University, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: takahashrs.noda.tus.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Daniel Balzani (Institute of Mechanics and Shell Structures, TU Dresden, Germany)
  • Akiyuki Takahashi (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • Yoshitaka Umeno (Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Shaoqiang Tang (Peking University, China)
  • Michael Kaliske (Institute for Structural Analysis, Germany)
  • Shinya Taketomi (Saga University, Japan)
  • Ikumu Watanabe (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan)
  • Siu Sin Jerry Quek (Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore)
  • Masato Tanaka (Toyota Central R&D Laboratories, Inc., Japan)
  • Tong-Seok Han (Yonsei University, Republic of Korea)
  • Makoto Uchida (Osaka City University, Japan)
  • Yuichi Tadano (Saga University, Japan)
  • Tomohisa Kumagai (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan)
  • Sei-ichiro Sakata (Kinki University, Japan)
  • Keonwook Kang (Yonsei University, Republic of Korea)
  • Kazumi Matsui (Yokohama National University, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW3-1 OW3-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW3-3 OW3-4 OW3-5

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OW4: High performance computing for computational engineering and science

Recently, various applications in the field of computational mechanics, such as computational fluid dynamics and structural analysis, demand high performance computing in order to achieve large-scale simulations. These applications require novel algorithms and computational methods optimized for modern multi- and many-core processors, such as NVIDIA's GPUs and Intel's Xeon/Phi, and supercomputers equipped with these processors. In this workshop, we will discuss the state-of-the-art research in high performance computing for computational engineering and science. Emphasis will be on novel advanced applications and libraries optimized for recent supercomputers, and new algorithms and optimization techniques for modern architectures. Speakers from various kinds of backgrounds will address application design and performance results.

Organizers:

  • T. Shimokawabe (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • R. Shioya (Toyo University, Japan)
  • G. Hashimoto (University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • K. Nakajima (University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • T. Aoki (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: shimokawabesim.gsic.titech.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Jérôme Frisch (Institute of Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Building E3D, RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
  • Akihiro Ida (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Rio Yokota (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Weichung Wang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan)
  • Ichitaro Yamazaki (University of Tennessee, Knoxville, U.S.A.)
  • Keigo Matsuda (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Japan)
  • Kengo Nakajima (The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Tomonori Yamada (The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Satoshi Ohshima (The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Patrick Sanan (USI Lugano, Switzerland)
  • Takashi Shimokawabe (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Santiago Badia (UPC & CIMNE, Spain)
  • Takayuki Aoki (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Hiroshi Kawai (Tokyo University of Science-Suwa, Japan)
  • Ryuji Shioya (Toyo University, Japan)
  • Johan Jansson (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)
  • Gaku Hashimoto (The University of Tokyo, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW4-1 OW4-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW4-3 OW4-4 OW4-5

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OW5: Mesoscale simulations for materials and fluids

Mesoscale simulation techniques are effective and important for materials and fluids. Various models ranging from relatively microscopic models (e.g. coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD), dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and other methods based on N-body problem) to relatively macroscopic models (e.g. phase-field method (PFM), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and other methods based on continuum mechanics) have been developed and utilized for mesoscopic simulations of multi-phase and/or complex systems. Application, large-scale simulation, high-accuracy scheme, numerical stabilization scheme and coupling scheme using these models are discussed in this Organized Workshop (OW).

Organizers:

  • J. Matsumoto (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan)
  • N. Takada (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan)
  • T. Takaki (Kyoto Institute of Technology (KIT), Japan)
  • N. Arai (Kinki University, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: matsumoto-junichiaist.go.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Hiroki Matsubara (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Masashi Yamaguchi (Bridgestone Corporation, Japan)
  • Wenlai Huang (Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)
  • Roberto Rojas (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Xiao-Dong Niu (Shantou University, China)
  • Munekazu Ohno (Hokkaido University, Japan)
  • Yoshihiro Suwa (Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Japan)
  • Toshihiro Kaneko (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • Yasutaka Yamaguchi (Osaka University, Japan)
  • Takahiro Murashima (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Naoki Takada (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan)
  • Noriyoshi Arai (Kinki University, Japan)
  • Sathish K. Sukumaran (Yamagata University, Japan)
  • Tomohiro Takaki (Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • John Molina (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Tomohiro Sawada (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan)
  • Zhipeng Guo (Tsinghua University, China)
  • Junichi Matsumoto (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW5-1 OW5-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW5-3 OW5-4 OW5-5

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OW6: Simulation for natural disaster mitigation and environmental problems

In recent years, large-scale natural disasters have occurred worldwide due to such causes as global warming, earthquakes, tsunamis, and others. Computational engineering and science technologies are expected to give us powerful tools to solve such complicated safety-related and environmental problems. Heavy rain, typhoons, tornados, earthquakes, and tsunamis cause various disasters. Natural hazard mitigation is an important problem for human life. In summarizing the recent disasters, it is clear that structure, fluid, and ground interaction problems are key issues. These problems have been discussed with respect to specialized areas such as geotechnical, coastal, and structural engineering. However, effective methods for dealing with these problems have not yet been developed. The creation of an advanced mitigation plan for these problems requires exhaustive research that is free from classical technical categories. Given that viewpoint, this mini-symposium will discuss the recent advancement of computational engineering and science for structure-fluid-soil interaction problems. Surveying and monitoring with information and communication technologies, designing with advanced computer simulation techniques, and risk evaluation with statistical and reliability theory will be summarized by the keynote lecture, by the organizers, and through discussion.

Organizers:

  • K. Maeda (Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • H. Hasebe (Nihon University, Japan)
  • K. Kashiyama (Chuo University, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: maeda.kenichinitech.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Pedro Diez (UPC BarcelonaTech, Spain)
  • Hitoshi Nakase (Tokyo Electric Power Services Co.,LTD, Japan)
  • Kentaro Nakai (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • Miguel Angel Celigueta (CIMNE, Spain)
  • Andy Take (Queen's University, Canada)
  • Kazunori Fujisawa (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Kenichi Maeda (Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Shinsuke Takase (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Kazuya Nojima (Nippon Koei Co. Ltd., Japan)
  • Tatsuya Matsuda (Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan)
  • Ming-Chen Hsu (Iowa State University, U.S.A.)
  • Seizo Tanaka (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
  • Luke McGuire (U.S. Geological Survey, U.S.A.)
  • Marek Behr (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
  • Tomofumi Koyama (Kansai University, Japan)
  • Hiroshi Hasebe (Nihon University, Japan)
  • Takamasa Hasama (Kajima Technical Research Institute, Kajima Corporation, Japan)
  • Alessandro Franci (Universitat Poliètcnica de Catalunya, Spain)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW6-1 OW6-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW6-3 OW6-4 OW6-5

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OW7: Computational biomechanics at nano and micro scales

The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers who work on computational biomechanics and biophysics at molecular, cellular and multicellular scales. We will discuss the biophysics of the biological membrane and cytoskeleton, the biomechanics of blood cells and ciliated cells, and the multi-scale modeling of cellular flow and tissue morphogenesis. This class of problems involves molecular dynamics, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, fluid-structure interaction, and multi-physics, and hence the topics are expected to cover recent advancements in a wide range of computational physics and mechanics.

Organizers:

  • Y. Imai (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Y. Inoue (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • K. Koshiyama (Osaka University, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: yimaipfsl.mech.tohoku.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Timm Krueger (University of Edinburgh, U.K.)
  • Dmitry A. Fedosov (Institute of Complex Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany)
  • Takuji Ishikawa (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Keng-Hwee Chiam (A*STAR, Singapore)
  • Yasuyuki Sawada (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • Kenta Ishimoto (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Yohsuke Imai (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Toshihiro Omori (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Kenichiro Koshiyama (Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Japan)
  • Taiki Shigematsu (Osaka University, Japan)
  • Hiroshi Noguchi (Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Daiki Matsunaga (Tohoku University, Japan)
  • Taeyoon Kim (Purdue University, U.S.A.)
  • Satoshi Ii (Osaka University, Japan)
  • Masashi Tachikawa (RIKEN, Japan)
  • Yasuhiro Inoue (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • David Saintillan (University of California, San Diego, U.S.A.)
  • Mikko Karttunen (University of Waterloo, Canada)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW7-1 OW7-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW7-3 OW7-4 OW7-5

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OW8: Particle simulations for fluid and solid mechanics

Particle simulations have been widely used in various engineering fields not only for fluid dynamics but also for solid mechanics, in particular, because of their robustness in handling dynamic changes of free surface, propagation of discontinuous deformations and so on. Typical representative particle methods are Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Moving Particle Simulation (MPS) and Material Point Method (MPM). The advantage of these methods may be related to their meshless features, and these features sometimes bring us difficulties in treatment of boundary conditions and in multi-phase problems with high density ratios. The aim of this workshop is to discuss and exchange ideas on the recent developments and current challenges in particle simulations.

Organizers:

  • M. Asai (Kyushu University, Japan)
  • K. Murotani (University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • A. Khayyer (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • S. Koshizuka (University of Tokyo, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: asaidoc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Daisuke Nishiura (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Japan)
  • Kohei Murotani (University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Abdelraheem M. Aly Abd Allah (South Valley University, Egypt)
  • Takuya Tsuji (Osaka University, Japan)
  • Mitsuteru Asai (Kyushu University, Japan)
  • Naoto Mitsume (The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Yusuke Imoto (Graduate school of Mathematics, Kyushu University, Japan)
  • Masaki Iwasawa (RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Japan)
  • Abbas Khayyer (Kyoto University, Japan)
  • Tasuku Tamai (Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Mehmet Yildiz (Sabanci University, Turkey)
  • Naoki Tsuruta (Port and Airport Research Institute, Japan)
  • Ha Bui (Monash University, Australia)
  • Jin Sun (University of Edinburgh, U.K.)
  • G.R. Liu (University of Cincinnati, U.S.A.)
  • Kimiaki Washino (Osaka University, Japan)
  • David Le Touzé (Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France)
  • Benedict D. Rogers (Univ. of Manchester, U.K.)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW8-1 OW8-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW8-3 OW8-4 OW8-5

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OW9: Fracture and Damage Mechanics of Advanced Materials

Advanced materials (including composite materials) are widely used in the automobile, aerospace structures, electronic devices and so on. Therefore the future development of the materials are expected in these industrial fields. To improve the reliability of the structural materials, improvements of material properties are desired for elastic moduli, strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life and damage tolerance against static, cyclic and impact loading. In such situation, various computational approach, such as finite element method (FEM), boundary element method (BEM), finite volume method (FVM) and so on, have been used. On the other hand, in case of the numerical analyses of inhomogeneous structure, traditional micro-mechanics scheme, homogenization method or phase-field method are requested

The aim of the workshop is to discuss the technology which estimates the material properties and damage/fracture behavior of the advanced materials using numerical and computational methods. In addition, impact damage evaluation, non-destructive inspection or fatigue life prediction based on computational approach are discussed in this workshop too.

Organizers:

  • M. Arai (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • H. Okada (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • T. Nagashima (Sophia University, Japan)
  • Y. Wada (Kindai University, Japan)
  • T. Matsuda (Tsukuba University, Japan)
  • M. Omiya (Keio University, Japan)
  • D. Okumura (Nagoya University, Japan)

Corresponding organizer
   Email address: arainuae.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Invited speakers:

  • Zhanli Liu (Tsinghua University, China)
  • Satoyuki Tanaka (Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan)
  • Fei Xu (Northwestern Polytechnical University, China)
  • Dai Okumura (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • Yasunori Yusa (Tokyo University of Science, Japan)
  • Shawn Chester (New Jersey Institute of Technology, U.S.A.)
  • Atsushi Kubo (Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Kozo Koiwa (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan)
  • Masaomi Nishimura (Shinshu University, Japan)
  • Enyang Wang (Alternative Fuel Contatiner LLC, Canada)
  • Keita Goto (Nagoya University, Japan)
  • Nelson V. De Carvalho (National Institute of Aerospace, resident at NASA Langley Research
  • Center, U.S.A.)
  • Kosuke Takahashi (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
  • Baolin Wang (University of Western Sydney, Australia)
  • Mao Kurumatani (Ibaraki University, Japan)
  • Kazuki Shibanuma (The University of Tokyo, Japan)
  • Yoshitaka Wada (Kinki University, Japan)

Go to the program of this workshop:

Oct. 13 Tue.: OW9-1 OW9-2
Oct. 14 Wed.: OW9-3 OW9-4 OW9-5

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